Bruce Fritch, Strategic Snapshots: Refreshing Our Perspective

When Values Vaporize

Harsh MomentActing as a leader or participant aiming to accomplish worthy goals requires both vision and courage.

Both are required.

In any moment when a worthy vision is extraordinary and its mere articulation seems brave, the articulation itself can feel satisfyingly courageous. If then the check goes in the box — “Done” — follow-through is forestalled, action does not materialize, the vision evaporates in the despairing experience of worthy-visionary-words-without-courageous-action. Deeply disappointing. Vapor of hope.

Today, everyone in a position of authority is called a “leader”, so the word has lost precision. In stuffed-shirted ways, “leaders” articulate human values and worthy goals while authorizing cultures of fear and apprehension. Such is not the congruence of real leadership.

We call for discerning conversations, for leadership accountability, for acts of courageous consummation to erect the bridges and latticeworks enroute to making worthy visions manifest in closely held or publicly traded enterprise. Effective strategic and tactical planning, with culture change and accountability, is often the difference between mediocrity and sustained brilliance. Without courageous action there is very limited leadership; and if the action is brazen self-interest, there is probably self-authorized crime without authentic social courage.

Take the initiative to hold discerning conversations about the leadership you witness every day, articulate the worthy vision, and courageously follow through with action that inspires us all!


Fritch Consulting facilitates business growth by collaborating with leaders who are striving with core-values to insightfully "do the right thing." I write and speak out of my deep concern for the current crisis of integrity in leadership, with the hope of creating a more discerning conversation and promoting effective action.

Your viewpoints are appreciated and I would be happy to continue the conversation — so I encourage you to Comment below or contact me directly: [email protected]. — Bruce W. Fritch

  • Chip R. Bell

    Bruce always puts his compassionate
    finger directly on the ill that fevers too many organizations. Great
    leaders boldly live in obvious and consistent ways the values highlighted in
    the annual report. They honor mavericks that are willing to question;
    they celebrate brave souls willing to stand up for what is truly noble and
    trustworthy. Great leaders let their consciences trump their coffers; service
    to others supersedes even a hint of self-interest. When leaders of
    organizations lose their moral compass, the organization remains lost no matter
    the clarity of its strategic plan.